Tag Archives: Mythology

Jung’s use of mythology, which provides a unique integration of science, psychology and religion.

The Societal Value of Conspiracy Theorists

On the Sunday Politics recently, Andrew Neil called the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones an idiot, and made a circular motion pointing his finger at his own head to suggest Jones was crazy. You can see the 5 minute exchange using the BBC’s video clip (right, or at the BBC website).

To many viewers, it may have seemed a natural response for Neil to dismiss Jones as a crazy person.  However, from the perspective of Jung’s analytical psychology, that would be to respond to an error with another error – because Neil allowed himself to get drawn into Jones’ black and white thinking.  Also, there is something of potential value in Jones’ intensity of belief and breadth of support – because it suggests there is something else occurring at a much deeper, cultural level.

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What makes a Jungian film analysis significant

Films can be much more than entertainment – they also provide mirrors to understand ourselves and the society in which we live.  For this reason, “Jungian” film analysis is popular because it provides deep insights into our individual and cultural maturity. In theory, this should help us to develop.  However, there is a problem with much allegedly-Jungian film analysis because it has the opposite effect – it holds us back.

Jung said there are two ways in which one can use creative works to help our development.  The first, which he called ‘psychological’, contributes very little to our understanding; the second, which he called ‘visionary’, is of significant value (Jung 1930, pp. 103-6).

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